Early Spring Bass Fishing Tips

Bass fishing is a pastime that can be enjoyed at any time of year by the millions of bass fishing enthusiasts all over the world. As bass are ever present in lakes, pools, rivers and even the coastal regions off some countries, it is possible to fish all year round.

Obviously you have to tailor your style and technique to the bass area and the time of year, but if you can do that then there is no reason why you cannot experience good catch rates all year round.

However, you need to know what techniques to use at the various times of the year and the early spring phase is as good a time to start with as any.

There are definite fishing techniques and methods that should be applied to early spring fishing because it is in the pre-spawn phase. As such, the bass are often at their most active but also their most stresses. This can send your catch rate either way. It can actually be extremely frustrating because you are not guaranteed to have huge hauls.

Instead, you actually have to work for it. If you do though, you will find that the bass are at their largest and most impressive.

The one thing you should remember when fishing for bass in the early spring is that you do have to be prepared to try out several techniques from day to day because there is no uniform behaviour that bass conform to at this time of year. As such, you do have to be patient and extremely versatile in your fishing technique. It is not a trip for those that are stuck in their ways.

The first tip that you should take on board is to fish to the weather. If it is warm and the sun is shining then the fishing should be fast. However, if it is a cold day then they will return to their winter behaviour of settling deep in the body of water as well as under the cover of vegetation and in rocky banks.

Tasting the water temperature will help you to tailor your techniques to the day because bass are cold blooded. Their blood will cool or rise to match the water temperature and this determines whether they are active or extremely sluggish from day to day.

It is also important to remember that the temperatures will rise and drop throughout the day so it is important to be extremely aware of your surroundings and the weather conditions throughout your bass fishing sessions.

The golden rule of bass fishing in early spring is to match the temperatures of the water. If the water is warm then you should fish quickly to encourage the bass to bite.

Casting your line in the same place twice is essential but moving it within ten or fifteen minutes is always a good idea if you have yet to catch anything by that point.

Fishing in the top water is also a great tip if the action is good. However, if the weather is cold then fish deep and be sure to settle your line in one place for a while.



Source by Daniel Eggertsen

Live Worm Fishing

The very first time that you went fishing, what did you use to catch fish? I mean way back, when you were a kid, what did you use to use to catch fish? More than likely a live worm. Everyone knows that live worms are a great way to catch fish. The problem is that many anglers either stop fishing with worms after the age of 12 or continue to fish in the same manner that they did when they were 12 for the rest of their lives. This makes no sense to me, we do not do anything in our lives in the same manner as we did when we were kids, except of course the way we fish a live worm!

Most people tie on a large hook (size 4 or larger) and then attempt to "thread" a live worm onto that hook. Either that or or they simply hook the worm over and over again, so creating what I like to call a "worm ball". You see, this is fine when you're a kid, because you do not know any better, and are not really "fishing" anyway. When you're a kid, you're just trying to catch a fish.

Now that we're all adults, we need to begin fishing live worms properly. What's proper? Properly is making that live worm look as natural as possible. In order to consistently catch fish, and more importantly to catch trophy fish, a live worm needs to be presented naturally. Your worm needs to look as if you simply thread it in the water. Do you honestly think that a worm ball or a worm that's been threaded on a size 4 hook looks natural?

The most effective way to present a live worm is naturally through the use of gang hooks. What are gang hooks? A set of gang hooks is simply 2 small hooks ties in tandem. A set of pre-tied gang hooks enables the angler to present a live worm in a completely natural manner. When rigged on a set of gang hooks, a live worm looks the same as it does without any hooks in it! This is an incredibly big advantage to the angler. Not only that, but the fact that there are 2 hooks effectively doubles your caches of a hook set!

When it comes to live worm fishing, gang hooks are the only way to go. If you fish with live worms, a set of gang hooks will actually help you catch more fish. You do not watch the same movies as you did when you were a kid, so why fish a live worm in the same way?



Source by Trevor Kugler

Lunkerhunt LF01 Lunker Frog Series 2.5-Inch Green Tea Style Fishing Lure



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$7.99



The Lunkerhunt Lunker Frog is the most life like frog currently available in the industry. The Lunker Frog replicates an adult frog and has swimming legs that extend during the retrieve and retract on the pause. At rest the Lunker Frog is 2.5 inches and will extend up to 4.5 inches on the retrieve. The Lunker Frog behaves just like a living frog would in the water. At rest, the body of the Lunker frog drops down a little into the water perfectly replicating the action of a frog/bullfrog. This also results in higher hook-up percentages. The Lunker Frog features high quality components, a super soft hollow body construction, and a weedless design.At rest, the body of the Lunker frog drops down a little into the water perfectly replicating the action of a frog/bullfrog
The Lunkerhunt Lunker Frog is the most life like frog currently available in the industry
Used primarily for bass, pike and musky in freshwater
High quality components, a super soft hollow body construction, and a weedless design
Essential addition to any tackle box

Live Worm Fishing

The very first time that you went fishing, what did you use to catch fish? I mean way back, when you were a kid, what did you use to use to catch fish? More than likely a live worm. Everyone knows that live worms are a great way to catch fish. The problem is that many anglers either stop fishing with worms after the age of 12 or continue to fish in the same manner that they did when they were 12 for the rest of their lives. This makes no sense to me, we do not do anything in our lives in the same manner as we did when we were kids, except of course the way we fish a live worm!

Most people tie on a large hook (size 4 or larger) and then attempt to "thread" a live worm onto that hook. Either that or or they simply hook the worm over and over again, so creating what I like to call a "worm ball". You see, this is fine when you're a kid, because you do not know any better, and are not really "fishing" anyway. When you're a kid, you're just trying to catch a fish.

Now that we're all adults, we need to begin fishing live worms properly. What's proper? Properly is making that live worm look as natural as possible. In order to consistently catch fish, and more importantly to catch trophy fish, a live worm needs to be presented naturally. Your worm needs to look as if you simply thread it in the water. Do you honestly think that a worm ball or a worm that's been threaded on a size 4 hook looks natural?

The most effective way to present a live worm is naturally through the use of gang hooks. What are gang hooks? A set of gang hooks is simply 2 small hooks ties in tandem. A set of pre-tied gang hooks enables the angler to present a live worm in a completely natural manner. When rigged on a set of gang hooks, a live worm looks the same as it does without any hooks in it! This is an incredibly big advantage to the angler. Not only that, but the fact that there are 2 hooks effectively doubles your caches of a hook set!

When it comes to live worm fishing, gang hooks are the only way to go. If you fish with live worms, a set of gang hooks will actually help you catch more fish. You do not watch the same movies as you did when you were a kid, so why fish a live worm in the same way?



Source by Trevor Kugler

Early Spring Bass Fishing Tips

Bass fishing is a pastime that can be enjoyed at any time of year by the millions of bass fishing enthusiasts all over the world. As bass are ever present in lakes, pools, rivers and even the coastal regions off some countries, it is possible to fish all year round.

Obviously you have to tailor your style and technique to the bass area and the time of year, but if you can do that then there is no reason why you cannot experience good catch rates all year round.

However, you need to know what techniques to use at the various times of the year and the early spring phase is as good a time to start with as any.

There are definite fishing techniques and methods that should be applied to early spring fishing because it is in the pre-spawn phase. As such, the bass are often at their most active but also their most stresses. This can send your catch rate either way. It can actually be extremely frustrating because you are not guaranteed to have huge hauls.

Instead, you actually have to work for it. If you do though, you will find that the bass are at their largest and most impressive.

The one thing you should remember when fishing for bass in the early spring is that you do have to be prepared to try out several techniques from day to day because there is no uniform behaviour that bass conform to at this time of year. As such, you do have to be patient and extremely versatile in your fishing technique. It is not a trip for those that are stuck in their ways.

The first tip that you should take on board is to fish to the weather. If it is warm and the sun is shining then the fishing should be fast. However, if it is a cold day then they will return to their winter behaviour of settling deep in the body of water as well as under the cover of vegetation and in rocky banks.

Tasting the water temperature will help you to tailor your techniques to the day because bass are cold blooded. Their blood will cool or rise to match the water temperature and this determines whether they are active or extremely sluggish from day to day.

It is also important to remember that the temperatures will rise and drop throughout the day so it is important to be extremely aware of your surroundings and the weather conditions throughout your bass fishing sessions.

The golden rule of bass fishing in early spring is to match the temperatures of the water. If the water is warm then you should fish quickly to encourage the bass to bite.

Casting your line in the same place twice is essential but moving it within ten or fifteen minutes is always a good idea if you have yet to catch anything by that point.

Fishing in the top water is also a great tip if the action is good. However, if the weather is cold then fish deep and be sure to settle your line in one place for a while.



Source by Daniel Eggertsen

Use Plastic Worms to Catch Bass

Anyone that does any amount of fishing has had to learn how to use plastic worms to catch bass. It doesn’t matter if you are fishing for large or smallmouth bass worms work extremely well. They are most anglers primary bait and every anglers fall back if their favorite is not working. They are simple to use and come in many varieties.

Because there are so many varieties the choices can be confusing and you will have to experiment some in the waters you fish to actually find out works best. However there are some general guidelines on how to choose which color and size to use.

Fluorescent colors retain their color in deep waters whereas other colors turn a shade of grey. Color can be something to consider after you find the bass. If they’re following the lure, tapping it, or just not hitting it and you tried different presentations, try a different color of the same lure. In general, use dark colors in water with little light penetration such as muddy or stained water, and cloudy or windy days. And use light colors in water with more light penetration – i.e. clear water, sunny or calm days, etc. Use natural colors. Big bass learn from being caught not to resort to their curiosity to react to everything unnatural. That’s why natural looking baits produce bigger bass.

There are many opinions about what size to use and again you will have to experiment in your local waters to find out what works best in your waters. As a general rule use 6-7 ½ inch worms for big bass and 4 inch at all other times. Do not take this as a hard and fast rule as I fish the 4 inch worm with a lot of success catching both average and large bass.



Source by Doug Burns